Could your Colorado property tax be based on an unfair valuation?

| May 27, 2021 | Abatement

Filing a residential or commercial property tax abatement in Colorado is relatively straightforward. Unlike in other states, Colorado’s property owners can challenge their property value assessments even after they have paid the taxes and for two years in the past. So why don’t more people seek abatements?

At Robert Hill Law, we have been representing property owners in tax abatement cases and commercial property tax appeals for over 30 years. In some cases, we have uncovered property value assessments that were as high as 50% above the property’s actual value.

We examine every aspect of the property valuation process, including:

  • Recognizing an improper valuation
  • The methods of valuation used
  • How to determine market value
  • Supply and demand principles
  • The impact of a volatile market and economic obsolescence on property values

Once we have identified an unduly high valuation, we walk our clients through the process of requesting an abatement from the initial petition through any necessary appeals.

We do all this on a contingency fee basis, which means that you owe us nothing unless we succeed in getting your property taxes lowered. We take a portion of your award as our fee.

Our new white paper explains the basics

Robert Hill Law has just published a free white paper entitled “Tax Abatement: You Can’t Afford Not to Challenge Your Property Taxes in Colorado,” which discusses the process and principles involved. We invite you to read the white paper for detailed information.

At Robert Hill Law, we level the playing field against the vast taxation powers of the government and fight to achieve a just and accurate tax bill.